What to Plant in February (25 Best Plants to Grow in February)

What to Plant in February (25 Best Plants to Grow in February)

February is often the perfect time for homeowners to start planting due to favorable conditions such as lengthening daylight and protection from late frost. These factors, along with a more controlled temperature, allow a better head start to growing plants.

But how do we know which greenery is best for this month? Today, we’ll explore the various leafy vegetables, root crops, and flowers that are considered the best plants to grow in February!

Spinach

Spinach
Image by Days of the Year
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameSpinacia oleracea
USDA Zone3-11
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesYes
SizeCompact
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool temperatures
WateringRegular, consistent

Spinach is an ideal cold-season crop. Sow or plant spinach in February for optimal growth in cooler temperatures. 

Starting indoors or in a greenhouse provides a head start before outdoor transplanting. 

This timing takes advantage of late winter and early spring temperatures, promoting strong leafy growth and preventing premature flowering. 

Thyme

Thyme
Image by Better Homes & Gardens
Ease of GrowingEasy to Moderate ●●○○○
Scientific NameThymus vulgaris
USDA Zone4-9
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsSpring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesYes
SizeCompact, bushy
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, sandy-loam
TemperatureWarm to hot
WateringModerate, drought-tolerant

Optimal thyme planting is post-frost in late spring or early summer as this timing allows for robust root establishment to ensure a successful and flavorful harvest. It’s best to start thyme indoors or in a greenhouse, then transplant it outdoors in spring. 

Thyme prefers warmer temperatures, making it great for spring and summer gardens. 

Kale

Kale
Image by Britannica
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameBrassica oleracea (Acephala Group)
USDA Zone7-10 (can tolerate frost)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeCompact, leafy
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures
WateringRegular, consistent

Starting kale indoors in February or early spring ensures a better growing season and promotes healthy root development for this cold-hardy vegetable. Early planting promotes mature kale growth during cooler temperatures, enhancing flavor and texture. 

This timing guarantees a plentiful harvest of nutrient-rich leaves in spring, providing a fresh and nutritious addition to meals.

Cilantro

Cilantro
Image by The Spruce
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameCoriandrum sativum
USDA Zone2-11 (usually grown as an annual)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsSpring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeCompact, leafy
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures
WateringRegular, moderate

Kick off the growing season by starting cilantro indoors in February or early spring. This early planting guarantees a steady stream of flavorful leaves for culinary use later on during the warmer months. 

Establishing roots before the main growth period ensures robust and healthy cilantro plants. Thriving in cooler temperatures, a February start sets the stage for optimal cilantro growth, flavor, and texture.

Basil

Basil
Image by The Spruce
Ease of GrowingModerate ●●○○○
Scientific NameOcimum basilicum
USDA Zone4-10
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsAfter the last frost
Cold Frame or ClochesYes
SizeBushy, varies
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureWarm temperatures, 70°F to 80°F (21°C to 27°C)
WateringRegular, consistent

Jumpstarting the growth of basil seeds indoors in early spring lays the groundwork for hearty growth, letting the seedling’s roots take hold before the season ramps up. With this early boost, the herb develops richer flavors and more aromatic leaves. 

Getting ahead of the typical growing season extends your basil’s productivity, giving you more herby harvests.

Swiss Chard

Swiss Chard
Image by Unlock Food
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameBeta vulgaris subsp. cicla
USDA Zone2-10
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or late summer
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeLarge, leafy
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures, 40°F to 60°F (4°C to 15°C)
WateringRegular, ample

Start Swiss Chard indoors or in a greenhouse and transplant it outdoors in early spring or late summer. The timing mostly depends on the growing conditions and desired harvest time. 

In milder winter regions, starting it in February allows for an early growing season and a prolonged harvest of nutritious leaves.

Chilies

Chilies
Image by Kevin Is Cooking
Ease of GrowingModerate to Difficult ●●●●○
Scientific NameCapsicum annuum
USDA Zone9-11 (perennial); Annual in colder zones
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsAfter the last frost
Cold Frame or ClochesYes
SizeCompact, varies
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureWarm to hot temperatures, 70°F to 80°F (21°C to 27°C)
WateringRegular, consistent

Grow chilies as annuals in colder zones below USDA Zone 9 and as perennials in warmer zones. Begin by sowing indoors or in a greenhouse, transplanting after the last frost, and using cold frames or cloches for extra early protection. 

Growing them indoors in February provides a head start, ensuring they’re well-established for outdoor transplanting after the last frost. This early planting approach increases the chances of a plentiful chili harvest later in the season.

Radish

Radish
Image by The Spruce Eats
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameRaphanus sativus
USDA Zone2-10
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseNo
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeSmall, compact
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, loose
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures, 40°F to 60°F (4°C to 15°C)
WateringRegular, moderate

Radishes are typically grown outdoors without the need for indoor or greenhouse cultivation. Plant them in early spring or fall, and they don’t require cold frames or cloches. 

They adapt to various climates and can be planted in February in milder regions for an early growing season. 

Beetroot

Beetroot
Image by Healthline
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameBeta vulgaris
USDA Zone2-10
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or late summer
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeMedium, bulbous
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures, 40°F to 60°F (4°C to 15°C)
WateringRegular, consistent

Plant beetroot directly outdoors or consider starting it indoors or in a greenhouse. Plant in early spring or late summer, without needing cold frames. 

Starting indoors in February offers an early start, especially in milder winters, ensuring well-established plants for a successful harvest.

Eggplant

Eggplant
Image by Epicurious
Ease of GrowingModerate ●●○○○
Scientific NameSolanum melongena
USDA Zone5-12
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsAfter the last frost
Cold Frame or ClochesYes
SizeMedium to large, bushy
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureWarm to hot temperatures, 70°F to 80°F (21°C to 27°C)
WateringRegular, ample

Eggplants are commonly grown as annuals. You can start them indoors or in a greenhouse, then transplant them outdoors after the last frost. 

Use cold frames or cloches for protection in cooler temperatures.

Starting them indoors in February ensures they’re ready to produce abundant fruit when transplanted after the last frost.

Peas

Peas
Image by New Scientist
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NamePisum sativum
USDA Zone2-11
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseNo
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeVining, varies
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures, 40°F to 60°F (4°C to 15°C)
WateringRegular

Plant peas directly outdoors in early spring or fall, depending on the variety and desired harvest time. They’re pretty resilient and don’t need indoor sowing or greenhouse cultivation. 

In regions with milder winters, starting peas outdoors in February is possible for an early growing season. 

Sweet Pea

Sweet Pea
Image by Britannica
Ease of GrowingModerate to Difficult ●●●●○
Scientific NameLathyrus odoratus
USDA Zone2-11
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring
Cold Frame or ClochesYes
SizeClimbing, varies
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool temperatures, 40°F to 60°F (4°C to 15°C)
WateringRegular

Sweet peas are typically grown as annuals, especially when indoors or in a greenhouse. Transplant them outdoors in early spring, using cold frames or cloches for protection in cooler periods. 

Starting sweet peas indoors in February is common for robust seedling development, ready for outdoor transplanting after the frost risk is gone. 

Poppies

Poppies
Image by LoveToKnow
Ease of GrowingEasy to Moderate ●●○○○
Scientific NamePapaver spp.
USDA Zone3-9
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseNo
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeVaries, typically medium to tall
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, sandy-loam
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures, 50°F to 70°F (10°C to 21°C)
WateringLow to moderate

Directly plant poppies outdoors in early spring or fall, depending on the variety. Their easy growth makes them popular for gardens, especially when planted in February for early spring blooms in milder winter regions.

Dusty Miller

Dusty Miller
Image by The Spruce
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameCentaurea cineraria
USDA Zone8-10 (usually grown as an annual)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsAfter the last frost
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeCompact, mounding
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, sandy-loam
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures, 50°F to 70°F (10°C to 21°C)
WateringModerate

Start Dusty Miller by sowing indoors or in a greenhouse, then transplant outdoors after the last frost. It adapts to various climates and starting it indoors in February can give an early advantage for a well-developed garden display.

Gladiolus

Gladiolus
Image by Britannica
Ease of GrowingModerate to Difficult ●●●●○
Scientific NameGladiolus spp.
USDA Zone7-10 (typically grown as annuals or lifted in colder zones)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsSpring
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeTall, varies
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureWarm temperatures
WateringRegular, ample

Grow Gladiolus as annuals in warmer zones while in colder zones, lift and store corms in winter. Start indoors or in a greenhouse, transplanting in spring. 

Cold frames or cloches are usually unnecessary. 

Roses

Roses
Image by Plantura Magazin
Ease of GrowingModerate to Difficult ●●●●○
Scientific NameRosa spp.
USDA Zone2-11
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseNo
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeVaries, typically bushy
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureModerate to warm temperatures
WateringRegular, deep

Roses adapt to various climates although typically, they’re directly planted outdoors, and cold frames or cloches aren’t necessary. Plant them in early spring or fall for optimal establishment. 

Geranium

Geranium
Image by Martha Stewart
Ease of GrowingEasy to Moderate ●●○○○
Scientific NamePelargonium spp.
USDA Zone10-11 (usually grown as annuals)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsAfter the last frost
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeCompact to spreading
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureModerate to warm temperatures, 50°F to 70°F (10°C to 21°C)
WateringModerate

Begin geraniums indoors or in a greenhouse, transplanting after the last frost. Adaptable to different climates, starting geraniums indoors in February guarantees improved growth and more vibrant flowers and foliage after the frost.

Pansy

Pansy
Image by Good Housekeeping
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameViola × wittrockiana
USDA Zone4-8 (usually grown as annuals)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeCompact, low-growing
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool temperatures, 40°F to 60°F (4°C to 15°C)
WateringModerate

Start pansies indoors or in a greenhouse, then transplant outdoors in early spring or fall. Cold frames or cloches are usually unnecessary.

Pansies like cooler temperatures so starting them indoors in February can lead to more colorful displays when transplanted outdoors in early spring.

Begonia

Begonia
Image by Britannica
Ease of GrowingEasy to Moderate ●●○○○
Scientific NameBegonia spp.
USDA Zone10-11 (usually grown as annuals)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsAfter the last frost
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeVaries, typically compact to medium
LightIndirect light to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureModerate to warm temperatures,  50°F to 70°F (10°C to 21°C)
WateringModerate to high

Begin begonias indoors or in a greenhouse, then move them outside after the last frost. No need for cold frames or cloches as they’re quite resilient in cold temperatures. 

Agapanthus

Agapanthus
Image by Gardener’s Path
Ease of GrowingEasy to Moderate ●●○○○
Scientific NameAgapanthus spp.
USDA Zone7-11 (usually grown as perennials)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsSpring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeMedium to tall
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureModerate to warm temperatures,  50°F to 70°F (10°C to 21°C)
WateringModerate

Planting agapanthus in February is a great approach for strong root development before the growing season, making them more resilient. Start indoors or in a greenhouse, then transplant outdoors in spring or fall, aligning with their natural growth cycle. 

This timing ensures agapanthus are well-prepared to produce clusters of flowers in summer for an attractive garden display.

Dahlias

Dahlias
Image by Housing
Ease of GrowingModerate to Difficult ●●●●○
Scientific NameDahlia spp.
USDA Zone8-11 (usually grown as tubers or lifted in colder zones)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsAfter the last frost
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeVaries, typically medium to tall
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureWarm temperatures, 70°F to 80°F (21°C to 27°C)
WateringRegular, ample

Early dahlia planting in February promotes root growth and increases the chance of having healthy plants. Dahlias benefit from starting indoors or in a protected environment during February to provide warmth and the right growth conditions. 

Begin dahlias indoors or in a greenhouse, move them outside after the last frost. Cold frames or cloches aren’t usually needed as they’re quite tough.

Lily

Lily
Image by Planet Natural
Ease of GrowingEasy to Moderate ●●○○○
Scientific NameLilium spp.
USDA Zone3-9
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsSpring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeVaries, typically medium to tall
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureModerate to warm temperatures, 70°F to 80°F (21°C to 27°C)
WateringRegular, ample

Sowing, growing, or transplanting lilies in February is crucial because it allows the bulbs to establish roots before the growing season. This early start promotes sturdy and healthy plant development. 

Lilies require a period of chilling to initiate growth, and planting in February aligns with their natural growth cycle. Start lilies indoors or in a greenhouse, then you can transplant them outdoors during spring.

Cosmos

Cosmos
Image by Houseplant Central
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameCosmos bipinnatus
USDA Zone2-11 (usually grown as annuals)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsAfter the last frost
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeMedium to tall
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, average
TemperatureModerate to warm temperatures, 50°F to 70°F (10°C to 21°C)
WateringModerate

Cosmos cultivation begins with indoor sowing or greenhouse planting, followed by outdoor transplantation after the last frost. Cold frames or cloches are typically unnecessary for the cosmos.

Initiating cosmos indoors in February offers a strategic advantage, fostering robust growth post-frost for homeowners seeking stronger and healthier plants.

Lavender

Lavender
Image by Plant Addicts
Ease of GrowingEasy to Moderate ●●○○○
Scientific NameLavandula spp.
USDA Zone5-9
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsSpring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeCompact, varies
LightFull sun
SoilWell-drained, sandy-loam
TemperatureWarm to hot temperatures
WateringLow to moderate

Homeowners can start lavender indoors or in a greenhouse, then transplant it outdoors in spring or fall. There’s no need for cold frames or cloches as these Mediterranean plants can be pretty hardy.

Starting lavender indoors in February or early spring ensures an early growing season, leading to well-established and aromatic plants when transplanted outdoors. 

Calendula 

Calendula
Image by The Flowers Express Philippines
Ease of GrowingEasy ●○○○○
Scientific NameCalendula officinalis
USDA Zone2-11 (usually grown as an annual)
Sow Indoors or in GreenhouseYes
Plant OutdoorsEarly spring or fall
Cold Frame or ClochesNo
SizeCompact, bushy
LightFull sun to partial shade
SoilWell-drained, fertile
TemperatureCool to warm temperatures
WateringRegular, moderate

Calendula cultivation involves indoor sowing or greenhouse planting, followed by outdoor transplantation in early spring or fall. Cold frames or cloches are usually unnecessary.

Starting indoors in February or early spring yields a head start, resulting in strong plants with flowers valued for medicinal and culinary purposes.

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