20 Common Yellow Mushrooms

20 Common Yellow Mushrooms

It should be noted that while a cursory glance may help identify yellow mushrooms, you should always err on the side of caution. If you have doubts about the yellow mushroom being edible or not, avoid consuming it to prevent accidental poisoning.

In this article, you’ll find 20 yellow mushrooms with varying degrees of toxicity and edibility.

1. Flowerpot Parasol 

Flowerpot Parasol
Image by forest floor narrative
Scientific nameLeucocoprinus birnbaumii
Other Common Name(s)Plantpot Dapperlings
FamilyAgaricaceae
ToxicityToxic
EdibleNot edible

These yellow mushrooms are named since they tend to appear in many flowerpots and greenhouses. Flowerpot parasols can grow individually although they tend to appear in small clusters of pale yellow colors.

While it can worry some gardeners, these mushrooms don’t really present a problem to nearby plants. Flowerpot parasol mushrooms do not compete with plants since mushrooms rely on rotten organic matter to grow.

You’ll need to keep in mind that even if they’re harmless to your plants, they can be toxic when eaten by curious children and pets. If you spot these growing in your garden or pots, it would be best to remove them.

2. Golden Oyster Mushroom 

Flowerpot Parasol
Image by healing mushrooms
Scientific namePleurotus citrinopileatus
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyPleurotaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible

Native to northern China, eastern Russia, and Japan, the golden oyster mushroom is one of the most popular edible mushrooms. These golden yellow mushrooms got their names from their close resemblance to oysters.

In the wild, they can be easily spotted due to their distinctive color and shape. However, they are mostly cultivated for food production in many countries. 

If you stumble across some in the wild, it’s best to be cautious. This is due to some mushrooms that look very similar to the golden oyster but are quite toxic.

3. Chicken Of The Woods 

Chicken Of The Woods 
Image by food52
Scientific nameLaetiporus sulphureus
Other Common Name(s)Chicken mushroom, Crab of the woods, Sulphur shelf, Sulphur polypore
FamilyFomitopsidaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible

This yellow mushroom earned its common name by tasting like chicken meat. It usually grows on organic matter on the ground but can sometimes be found as a parasitic fungus on living trees.

The chicken of the woods can grow to be large and fan-like, with striking yellow to orange colors. There are several species that have a similar appearance to this mushroom.

It can only be distinguished by its undersides where tiny microscopic pores are present instead of ridges or gills. This mushroom can be eaten only when young and cooked. Otherwise, it may become toxic especially when growing on particular trees.

4. Golden Chanterelle 

Chicken Of The Woods 
Image by Forage SF
Scientific nameCantharellus cibarius
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyCantharellaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible

The golden chanterelle mushroom is an edible variety that is commonly found in nature. Usually, they grow in deciduous and coniferous forests that run from Scandinavia to the wonderful woods in the Mediterranean Basin.

Golden chanterelle mushrooms are easily distinguished by their color and characteristics. These mushrooms possess smooth caps, forked ridges, and curled edges that set them apart from other mushrooms with similar appearances.

Appreciated in many kitchens due to their fruity taste, golden chanterelle mushrooms can be a bit difficult to cultivate. As such, they remain wild to semi-wild in production.

5. Jack-O-Lantern Mushroom 

Chicken Of The Woods 
Image by healing mushrooms
Scientific nameOmphalotus olearius
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyMarasmiaceae
ToxicityToxic
EdibleNot Edible

Found in the lush woodlands of Europe and eastern North America, the Jack-O-Lantern mushroom grows profusely in the late summer to fall in large golden clusters. It’s quite easy to spot these mushrooms on buried roots and decaying stumps.

While the Jack-O-Lantern mushroom has a very pleasing appearance, it is quite toxic. In fact, it can be easily mistaken for other edible yellow mushrooms such as the golden chanterelle.

One way to tell Jack-O-Lantern mushrooms from their edible look-alikes is to look for them at night. These mushrooms glow in the dark due to an enzyme that emits a greenish light, truly earning its name.

6. Witch’s Butter 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by healing mushrooms
Scientific nameTremella mesenterica
Other Common Name(s)Yellow brain, Golden jelly fungus, Yellow trembler
FamilyTremellaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible but flavorless

The witch’s butter mushroom has an irregular shape due to its gelatinous mass. The color of this mushroom is yellow-orange and has a slimy lobed surface.

This mushroom grows in tropical and temperate regions that include the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. Most of the time, this strange jelly-like mushroom can be found growing in deciduous forests and mixed woodlands.

It usually grows near fungi that decompose wood since it relies on them for sustenance and is often considered a parasitic fungus. When this mushroom dries up, it turns to dark orange to red color.

7. Yellow Patches 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by flickr
Scientific nameAmanita flavoconia
Other Common Name(s)Orange amanita, Yellow wart, Yellow dust amanita
FamilyAmanitaceae
ToxicityToxic
EdibleNot edible

This yellow-capped mushroom has deep yellow warts and patches, hence its common name. It can be found growing profusely in the mixed woodlands of eastern North America.

It initially comes out from the ground with an egg-shaped cap that slowly flattens out as it matures. Young specimens start to show their yellow patches although these can be easily wiped off or washed away by the rain.

Due to their bright color and shape, yellow patches can be easily spotted in the wild. However, care should be exercised since they are quite toxic to humans and animals when ingested.

8. Golden Spindles 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by first nature
Scientific nameClavulinopsis fusiformis
Other Common Name(s)Spindle-shaped yellow coral, Spindle-shaped fairy club
FamilyClavariaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleOpinions vary

Widely distributed in North America, Europe, and Asia, this species of coral fungus feeds on the decaying wood found in forest floors. Due to their distinct shape, these mushrooms are commonly known as golden spindles.

Slim, elongated, and bright yellow, golden spindle mushrooms grow in dense clusters under rotting wood and moist groups of mosses. Although there are similar coral mushrooms, golden spindles can be easily identified by their color and growth patterns.

While these are considered non-toxic, they are not always edible. In fact, many experts still have conflicting opinions if the golden spindles mushroom is inedible or edible.

9. Golden Ear Mushroom 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by iNaturalist
Scientific nameTremella aurantia
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyTremellaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleOpinions vary

The golden ear mushroom is another species of jelly fungus. Found in various parts of Europe as well as North America, this mushroom can sometimes be mistaken for the witch’s butter mushroom.

One similarity that both mushrooms have is that they are parasitic fungi that rely on other fungi. However, this mushroom closely resembles an ear, with colors that range from yellow to orange. 

Normally, this golden ear mushroom makes its appearance sometime in the rainy days of late summer through fall. However, experts are still on the fence about its edibility although they have concluded on its non-toxicity.

10. Golden Waxcap 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by first nature
Scientific nameHygrocybe chlorophana
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyHygrophoraceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleCan be edible but flavorless

These tiny yellow mushrooms can be found growing in the woodland and grassland regions of North America, Europe, and Australia. This species gets its name from its cap, which looks shiny and covered with wax.

The genus has mushrooms that come in different colors and the golden yellow hue is just one of them. Normally, these mushrooms grow in small groups and appear in the fall. 

While these are not considered toxic, they are not considered excellent ingredients for meals. Despite their color, they tend to be rare and few with an unimpressive taste and small sizes.

11. Butter-Foot Bolete Mushroom 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by The Bolete Filter
Scientific nameBoletus auripes
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyBoletaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible

These yellow mushrooms usually grow in hardwood forests that house oak and beech trees. This spored mushroom is common in eastern Asia, Central America, and North America.

Found in bright delicious butter hues, these large yellow mushrooms keep their colors as they mature. In fact, they can grow up to five inches with a four-inch stem.

Wild butter-foot bolete mushrooms can be easy to find growing in the wild, especially in parts of Canada, Florida, Texas, and North Carolina. They can also be cultivated although care should be taken not to damage their delicate and spongy flesh.

12. Scaly Pholiota 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by first nature
Scientific namePholiota squarrosa
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyStrophariaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible

Found all over the woodlands of North America and Europe, the scaly pholiota grows on decaying organic matter like fallen trees and stumps. This parasitic yellow fungus tends to grow in tight clusters as it feeds on the nutrients of rotting woods and conifer trees.

These mushrooms can be easily identified by their scaly or hairy caps and stalks. As they mature, the gills turn brown from yellow.

Scaly pholiota mushrooms are considered non-toxic and edible. Some have described its taste as bitter with slight hints of lemon and garlic once cooked.

13. Yellow Brittlegill 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by first nature
Scientific nameRussula claroflava
Other Common Name(s)Yellow swamp russula, Yellow swamp brittlegill
FamilyRussulaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible

The yellow brittlegill mushroom grows well under wet aspen and birch woodlands in North America and Europe. With its bright yellow cap, white gills, and large size, it can be easily spotted and identified during the spring and summer seasons.

These beautiful yellow mushrooms are edible and can be used in a variety of ways. Some add the yellow brittlegill mushroom in soups and stews, while others sautee it.

It can also be grilled, although it can easily break down since this fungus is quite delicate. As an ingredient in main dishes or sides, this yellow mushroom can be quite a welcome addition to any diet.

14. Yellow Pholiota 

Witch’s Butter 
Image by Mushrooms of Russia
Scientific namePholiota flammans
Other Common Name(s)Flaming Pholiota, Flame scalecap
FamilyStrophariaceae
ToxicityUnknown
EdibleOpinions vary

The yellow Pholiota has wonderful golden yellow colorations all throughout its body. Its cap and stem, however, are covered in sharp scales.

They typically grow in bright clusters on the rotting stumps of decaying coniferous trees. These mushrooms can be found all over North America, Europe, and Asia.

While these mushrooms can look quite interesting, it’s best to avoid eating them. Experts are still clarifying if it is edible even if it is not toxic.

15. Golden Coincap 

 Golden Coincap 
Image by Texas Mushrooms
Scientific nameCyptotrama chrysopepla
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyPhysalacriaceae
ToxicityUnknown
EdibleUnknown

These small, bright, golden yellow mushrooms have visibly dry caps and stalks. The gills can be in white to yellow colors while the cap on top can be convex or flat.

While beautiful and striking, the golden coincap mushroom can have surfaces that are dull, powdery, or scaly. Depending on the circumstances, it can grow in singles or in clusters.

The status of its toxicity and edibility still remains uncertain as tests continue. If and when one comes across it growing on decaying wood, it’s best to just enjoy its appearance and leave it undisturbed.

16. Mud Puppy 

 Golden Coincap 
Image by Wikipedia
Scientific nameCantharellus californicus
Other Common Name(s)Oak chanterelle
FamilyCantharellaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible

Mud puppy mushrooms are native to California in the United States. These mushrooms can weigh up to four to five pounds each, making them the largest known species in the chanterelle family.

Due to the capacity to grow indeterminately, mud puppy mushrooms can grow longer than most mushrooms. The inner flesh has a yellowish color while its funnel-shaped body has a bright egg yolk shade.

The mud puppy is edible, with some people commenting on its slight fruity flavor even when cooked. While its overall taste is mild, the odor can be fragrant and sweet.

17. Wood Hedgehog 

Wood Hedgehog 
Image by Wikipedia
Scientific nameHydnum repandum
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyHydnaceae
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleEdible

Large and fleshy, wood hedgehog mushrooms grow well in the damp woodlands of Europe and North America. This particular mushroom has a span of two to six inches in diameter, depending on its maturity.

Named for their tiny spines under the cap, wood hedgehog mushrooms can look intimidating or dangerous. However, they are quite edible and apparently delicious.

Fresh or dried wood hedgehog mushrooms can be added to dishes. When cooked, these mushrooms impart earthy flavors that pair well with savory meat dishes.

18. Yellow Webcap Mushrooms 

 Yellow Webcap Mushrooms 
Image by Ultimate Mushroom
Scientific nameCortinarius delibutus
Other Common Name(s)Bluegill webcap
FamilyCortinarius
ToxicityNot toxic
EdibleNot edible

Yellow webcap mushrooms are commonly found growing around birch trees in Northern America. These pale yellow-orange mushrooms have a convex shape that slowly flattens as they mature.

Even when young, the gills of this mushroom appear bluish. The flesh is soft and yellowish while the cap is slimy.

While it is considered non-toxic, other similar-looking mushrooms can be quite toxic. To be safe, avoid ingesting this mushroom altogether.

19. Peeling Oysterling 

Peeling Oysterling 
Image by The BioFiles
Scientific nameCrepidotus mollis
Other Common Name(s)Jelly crep, Soft slipper mushroom
FamilyInocybaceae
ToxicityToxic
EdibleNot edible

The peeling oysterling mushroom is shaped like a kidney, with brownish undersides on the cap and grows without any stalks. It reproduces by dispersing spores through water or wind.

The rubbery, fan-shaped mushroom grows prolifically on the trunks, branches, and stumps of decaying broad-leaf trees. These can be found mostly in well-shaded humid woodlands near gushing waterfalls and tumbling streams.

Immature mushrooms start out pale before turning a deep yellow ochre color. One should be careful in picking these mushrooms as they are quite toxic and not fit for consumption. 

20. Yellow American Blusher 

Peeling Oysterling 
Image by asergeev
Scientific nameAmanita flavorubens
Other Common Name(s)None
FamilyAmanitaceae
ToxicityUnknown
EdibleUnknown

The yellow American blusher mushroom is a large specimen found growing in pines, oaks, and birches. Initially found in the American state of Ohio, this mushroom has yet to make major appearances in other areas of the United States.

The cap can range from bright yellow to a dark brownish yellow with darker colored warts. Under the cap, crowded gills are attached to the mushroom’s pale yellow stem.

Its toxicity level still remains unknown, as does its edibility. However, to be safe, it’s best to refrain from consuming the yellow American blusher mushroom.

FAQS

Why do I have yellow mushrooms?

If you have yellow mushrooms growing in your yard, this could mean that it has the perfect growing conditions. These conditions include:

•High humidity levels
•Constantly wet conditions
•Abundant organic matter
•Ideal temperatures ranges

Since mushroom spores are carried by water and wind, they can land in your garden and wait for the perfect time to grow.

How do I prevent yellow mushrooms from growing?

To prevent yellow mushrooms from growing in your container or yard, you need to make sure that houseplants and lawns are watered correctly. 
Provide houseplants with water only when the top two inches of soil is completely dry. For lawns, ensure that watering is done two to three times a week.

Can I eat yellow mushrooms?

Some yellow mushrooms are toxic and inedible, so it’s not recommended to simply pick up any for consumption. 
To make sure that your yellow mushrooms are fit for cooking, always buy them from reputable sellers and groceries. This is so much safer instead of walking around and randomly picking yellow mushrooms to eat.

What causes yellow mushrooms?

Yellow mushrooms pop up when the conditions are right. While not all mushrooms will be yellow, the most common one that appears in houseplants is the flowerpot parasol mushroom. 
Since these are basically harmless, you can leave them alone. However, if you have curious children and pets, it’s best to remove the yellow mushrooms entirely.

What kind of mushroom has a yellow top?

There are many species of mushrooms with yellow tops. The colors can range from pale yellow to deep golden ochre. 
The color of the mushroom does not indicate its toxicity or edibility, however. Rather, the coloration is due to the specific mushroom’s evolution over the years.

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