15 Purple-Flowered Vines and Climbing Plants For Your Garden

Purple Flowered Vines and Climbing Plants For Your Garden

Looking to add a pop of color to your garden? We’re certain these purple-colored plants will stand out and brighten up any area in no time! 

Read on as we list down 15 kinds of purple-flowered vines and climbing plants along with their care requirements to help you best identify which are perfect for your space. 

1. Wisteria

Wisteria
Image: Martha Stewart
Common Name(s)Wisteria
Scientific NameWisteria 
FamilyFabaceae
Geographic Origin• East Asia 

• Vietnam

• Northern

• Iran

• Eastern United States

• Southern Canada
Unique Characteristics• Deciduous climbers

• Floral clusters growing 2 to 36 inches long depending on the variety

• Scented flowers 
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size10 to 30 feet
Watering RequirementsAverage
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Best in full sun

• Can grow in partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 4 to 9
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)Yes

The wisteria is one of the most beautiful climbing plants out there and for good reason. This twining vine produces an abundance of cascading light purple-colored flowers that grow in large clusters.

Since the wisteria plant is a perennial vine, it grows similarly to how grapes grow in vines. As a result, you can expect that the wisteria plant will become dense over time, especially because of its aggressive vining nature. 

Its large canopies and showy flowers can serve as shade, which is why it’s commonly planted alongside large trees, archways, pergolas, and walls, especially in the springtime when their bloom is at its peak.

However, it can get quite heavy the larger its canopies and the longer its vines are. Hence, regular pruning and maintenance are necessary to avoid wrecking nearby structures.

Wisteria
Image: Hamilton Spectator

While the wisteria can withstand partial sunlight, there’s a lesser chance that it’ll flower properly. For this plant, sunlight is a requirement for optimal blooms. 

The length of their clusters or racemes will vary depending on the species and its environmental conditions. For the best blooms, your wisteria plant should grow in full sun.

Some varieties such as the Wisteria frutescens grow clusters that are merely 2 to 5 inches long. Meanwhile, varieties like Wisteria floribunda develop some of the longest clusters with lengths of about 12 to 36 inches.

Wisteria
Image: Flower Magazine

If you’re looking to grow this beauty, you’ll need to think twice about where you plant it. The wisteria’s twisty vines curl around its stems along with nearby infrastructures for support.

As a result, you can expect that the beautiful wisteria plant can easily claim surrounding structures if it isn’t regularly pruned and maintained. It can also accidentally girdle nearby trees, resulting in their death.

Nevertheless, it’s worth noting that there are about 9 different varieties of Wisterias from around the world to choose from. 

Asian varieties are known to grow more aggressively than their American counterparts. The seeds of American wisteria varieties are more bean-shaped and smooth compared to the Asian varieties which are usually covered with fine and small hairs.

To give you a better idea of the different kinds of wisteria in the market, here’s a list of some of its most popular varieties:

Wisteria
Image: Southern Living

American wisteria (Wisteria frutescens) is normally found alongside swamps, ponds, and streams near the woods. Native to the United States, the American Wisteria is well-known for its bright green foliage that helps its deep purple flowers.

Wisteria
Image: Cricket Hill Garden

Japanese Wisteria (Wisteria floribunda) is known for its strongly scented flowers that bloom for longer than most varieties. A decorative plant, the Japanese Wisteria climbs hastily, easily covering any nearby structure.

However, it’s deemed an invasive species in the mid-Atlantic and Southeastern United States. 

Wisteria
Image: MyGardenLife

Kentucky Wisteria (Wisteria macrostachya) is native to the Southern United States and is often referred to as the ‘Blue Moon’ Wisteria. It’s known for its speedy growth and ability to bloom blue and purple-colored flowers thrice a year.

Wisteria
Image: Garden Design

Unfortunately, the lovely wisteria plant is considered an invasive species in several areas. Hence, if you’re adamant about growing it on your property, you’ll need to find a variety that doesn’t harm your local flora and fauna.

As far as care requirements are concerned, wisteria is relatively easy to manage. It has average watering requirements and does well in partial and full sun, depending on the hardiness zone of your area.

Even then, mature and well-established wisteria plants are capable of handling dry conditions well. In fact, they can withstand neglect, only needing deep watering every now and then. 

Wisteria
Image: Tropical Plants and Flowers

Remember that all parts of the Wisteria plant, most especially its seeds and pods, are toxic to humans and animals when ingested in large quantities. 

It contains lectin and wisterin, which when consumed can cause gastrointestinal problems, nausea, a burning sensation in the mouth, abdominal pain, and even fatality.

So if you have young children and pets in your home, you may want to consider the other purple flowering plants on our list.

2. Passion Vine

Passion Vine
Image: Dallas Garden Buzz
Common Name(s)• Passion Flower

• Passion Vine

• Maypop
Scientific NamePassiflora incarnata
FamilyPassifloraceae
Geographic Origin• Central America

• North America

• South America
Unique Characteristics• Brightly-colored, slender, thread-like membranes

• Oval-shaped petals
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size6 to 30 feet
Watering RequirementsAverage
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Best in full sun

• Can grow in partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 6 to 10
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)Varies by type

If you’re on the hunt for a showy flower that’ll have heads turning, you’ll want to check out this freaky bloom. 

An undeniable conversation starter, the passion vine creates flowers that look out of this world and are almost alien-like. Its exotic appearance can be attributed to its weirdly-shaped stamens that form a ring, sepals, and brightly-colored filaments.

Passion Vine
Image: UF/IFAS Gardening Solutions

What’s a flower without petals, right? The passion flower also grows a layer of several petals right below the corona or the slender, thread-like membranes.

There are about 500 species bearing a variety of colors, from purple to blue hues. Though, most grow vines and tendrils that help them latch onto nearby structures.

It’s also fun to note that some major species of the passion vine are capable of bearing fruit, most popularly known as the passion fruit.

Passion Vine
Image: Michigan Bulb

Given its appearance, you may suspect that this ornamental plant best fits a tropical climate. In fact, that’s right – it’s native to the neotropical areas of the Americas, specifically in the Central, North, and South regions.

The passion vine grows best in areas that receive at least 4 to 6 hours of full sun, though it can withstand partial shade, too.

Nevertheless, passion vine can be grown nearly anywhere as long as your zone type fits its requirements. 

Passion Vine
Image: Building Center No.3

It’s important to note that the passion vine has relatively shallow roots. Hence, prefers an environment that receives some shelter, especially during harsh weather such as strong winds and rain that can damage it. 

Thus, it’s recommended that passion vine plants be grown near structures such as a wall where they can receive protection and support.

In fact, thanks to its self-clinging nature, you can even train it to grow upward decorative structures such as trellises, archways, and even a pergola. That will make for a low-budget yet ornamental privacy screen. 

Passion Vine
Image: The Home Depot

The passion plant is relatively easy to maintain as long as it’s in high-quality well-drained soil and receives about 1 to 1.5 inches of water weekly. Depending on your zone, you may want to water as frequently as needed to prevent the soil from drying out.

For those with young children and pets around, it’s also worth keeping in mind that the leaves of passion flower along with its unripe fruits contain a few toxins that can induce nausea and vomiting. On the brighter side, they aren’t poisonous.

As for its flowers, they were traditionally used as a calming herb to help treat hysteria, anxiety, and insomnia, among others. 

3. Blue Sky Vine

Blue Sky Vine
Image: Housing
Common Name(s)• Blue Sky Vine

• Blue Trumpet Vine

• Blue Sky Thunbergia

• Angel’s Trumpet

• Bengal Trumpet

• Bengal Clock Vine

• Royal Clock Vine

• Indian Sky Vine
Scientific NameThunbergia grandiflora
FamilyAcanthaceae
Geographic Origin• China

• India

• Southeast Asia
Unique Characteristics• Bluish-purple, bell-shaped flowers with a white or yellow-colored throat

• Bright-green, heart-shaped, serrated leaves
Plant Type• Perennial

• Annual
Plant Size15 to 40 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Prefers full sun

• Tolerates partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 8 to 11
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)No

The blue sky vine goes by many names depending on where you’re from. It’s most popularly known for growing bluish-purple-colored flowers that stand out against its bright-green, heart-shaped, serrated foliage.

Its cupcake-like blooms only grow to about 3 inches in diameter. The inside of its funnel is typically white or yellow-colored, which makes it a sought-after attraction among pollinators such as bees and butterflies. 

Hence, having these around will greatly improve the pollinator population in your garden. 

Blue Sky Vine
Image: Housing

Its aggressive vining nature makes it an ideal covering for trellises or fences as its foliage can grow densely over time. 

Alternatively, you can plant it along pergolas or large trees to let its tendrils flow freely.

If you don’t have much space to spare, the blue sky vine also grows well in hanging baskets and pots, too. 

However, keep in mind it can easily take over structures without regular pruning and maintenance. In fact, they can grow to as long as 30 feet in a single season. 

As you can see, the blue sky vine can be quite high-maintenance in this aspect. So if you’re not one to dedicate time to trimming every now and then, you may want to consider the other varieties on this list.

Blue Sky Vine
Image: Santhi Online Plants Nursery

Originally from India, China, and the Southeast Asian regions, it’s known to be a tropical plant that can fare well in colder climates. It’s actually quite hardy and can withstand frost-free conditions.

If you live in a warmer climate, your blue sky vine is likely to be a perennial, which means that you can enjoy its beauty throughout the year. Meanwhile, if you live in a colder climate, it’s likely to be an annual and even tend to defoliate.

Blue Sky Vine
Image: Le Rose di Firenze

The blue sky vine has moderate watering requirements, only needing to be deeply watered once every 10 to 14 days. 

It’s also quite hardy, capable of tolerating brief dry spells. Even then, it needs regular moisture to satisfy its growing requirements.

4. Perennial Sweet Pea

Perennial Sweet Pea
Image: Plant Care Today

Common Name(s)• Perennial Sweet Pea

• Everlasting Pea

• Broad-leaved Everlasting Pera

• Perennial Peavine
Scientific NameLathyrus latifolius
FamilyFabaceae
Geographic OriginMediterranean
Unique Characteristics• Lance-shaped leaflets 

• Smooth yet delicate stem

• Bold, purplish-pink flowers with broad, wing-like petals
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size6 to 12 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate to Low
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Prefers full sun

• Tolerates partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 4 to 9
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)Yes

Contrary to popular belief, the perennial sweet pea isn’t as fragrant as its name makes it out to be. In fact, it’s one of the least fragrant sweet pea varieties.

Even so, it does a great job of attracting pollinators. This is great for the rest of your garden, especially if you’re growing vegetable crops.

Perennial Sweet Pea
Image: North Carolina Extension Garden Plant Toolbox

The perennial sweet pea is well-loved for its bold, purplish-pink flowers. It’s a rather showy flower with broad, wing-like petals that looks similar to that of orchids. 

The perennial sweet pea is a fan favorite because its flowers can stay in bloom the entire summer. By pinching off old flowers, you can even extend its blooming season until fall.

In a garden that’s typically overwhelmed with greenery, the perennial sweet pea adds a much-needed pop of color.

Perennial Sweet Pea
Image: Hill Farm Nursery

Given its vining nature, it needs a lot of space to crawl onto supporting structures such as trellises and walls. This also makes it a great privacy cover or divider.

The perennial sweet pea does well in smaller containers, too, such as raised beds or pots where its vines can gracefully spill over. If you’d like a blooming garden floor, you can also grow these on the ground to sprawl. 

It has lance-shaped leaves that don’t grow any larger than 2 inches long. These come in green hues and grow in compounds alternately on a smooth yet delicate stem.

Perennial Sweet Pea
Image: Perennial Permaculture

Though keep in mind that the perennial sweet pea tends to grow quite vigorously, reaching lengths of up to 12 feet. Hence, it can get quite heavy due to its dense cluster of blooms. 

Having said that, it’ll need to be pruned every once in a while throughout the year to avoid overgrowth. 

Don’t be discouraged, though, because despite looking difficult to grow because of its ornamental look, the perennial sweet pea is actually a breeze to maintain. 

Perennial Sweet Pea
Image: Pinetree Garden Seeds

It’s rather drought-tolerant, which makes it an ideal bloom for spaces that receive minimal rainfall. Hence, you can get away with deep watering every now and then, so all you need to do is to pay attention to the state of the soil.

It also does best in full sun, needing about 6 hours of direct sunlight daily. Though, it also fares well in shaded areas with about 4 to 6 hours of light.

Perennial Sweet Pea
Image: Wag!

Did you know that the perennial sweet pea has also been dubbed a nitrogen fixer? As a member of the legume family, it releases nitrogen into the soil that can improve soil health and increase nutrient levels which can benefit neighboring plants.

Thus, the perennial sweet pea makes a great companion plant for heavy nitrogen feeders such as tomatoes, eggplants, and pumpkins, among others. 

As for toxicity, the perennial sweet pea is considered mildly poisonous when its seeds are eaten in large quantities. Though there’s no need to fret as the symptoms are quite mild, often just a minor upset stomach.

5. Bougainvillea

Bougainvillea
Image: Housing
Common Name(s)Bougainvillea
Scientific NameBougainvillea
FamilyNyctaginaceae
Geographic OriginBrazil
Unique Characteristics• Showy bracts that feel thin and papery

• Dainty, trumpet-shaped flowers either in white or yellow

• Woody and thorny stem
Plant Type• Perennial

• Annual
Plant Size15 to 40 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate to low
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Prefers full sun

• Tolerates partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 9 to 11 
Toxicity (Touch)Yes (Sap)
Toxicity (Ingestion)No

Bougainvillea is the perfect plant if you want beautiful, show-stopping blooms all throughout the year. Because of how aggressively and densely it can grow, bougainvilleas are perfect for filling in empty spaces.

In fact, this vining plant can grow to more than 40 feet long and 10 feet wide, which makes it great for adding an extra layer to fences, privacy screens, and walls. 

Bougainvillea
Image: Fast Growing Trees

More often than not, homeowners grow bougainvilleas along trellises, arbors, and pergolas. Its tropical and summery look makes it a perfect addition to the poolside, too.

Bougainvillea also behaves similarly to a shrub, so it can be planted in large pots or containers. Just be sure to maintain their shape or else they’ll crawl their way out.

Bougainvillea
Image: Pinterest

Though, if you’re into that look you can grow them in hanging baskets. That’ll give them a carefree and airy look, especially since the bracts of the bougainvillea flower are thin and papery.

In case you didn’t know, the colored blooms aren’t actually flowers. They’re called ‘bracts’ which are technically leaves.

Its leaves protect the real flowers within which are small, dainty, and trumpet-shaped. They come in either white or yellow colors. 

Speaking of colors, bougainvilleas come in an array of shades from bright oranges to pale pinks. There are also different hues of purple to choose from, from deep to light.

Bougainvillea
Image: North Carolina Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox

Its stem, on the other hand, is woody and thorny, so you’ll need to be careful when handling it. Else, you might accidentally cut yourself and develop an allergic reaction.

Be wary of its sap, too, as it’s known to be mildly toxic. Direct contact or ingestion in large quantities can cause sickness and skin issues.

Bougainvillea
Image: Brisbane City Council Weed

On the flip side, maintaining a bougainvillea is easy peasy. Since it’s a tropical plant, it thrives in warmer climates and drier environments.

Thus, it only needs moderate to low watering. Once it’s established, you can skip the daily watering as the bougainvillea is quite drought-tolerant.

Instead, you can give it a deep watering once every 3 to 4 weeks. That said, be sure that its container has adequate drainage to avoid standing water that could lead to root rot. 

Bougainvillea
Image: Pinterest

Aside from that, the bougainvillea plant loves the sun, like, borderline obsessed, to say the least. It requires a minimum of 6 hours of direct sunlight daily for optimal flower growth.

In fact, the more sun your plant receives, the more blooms it’ll grow. So if you want a flower-filled bougainvillea, you can’t skimp out on the sun exposure.

6. Trailing Snapdragon

Trailing Snapdragon
Image: Santa Monica Mountain Trails Council

Common Name(s)• Twining Snapdragon

• Creeping Snapdragon

• Vining Snapdragon

• Kellog’s Snapdragon
Scientific NameMaurandya scandens or Asrina scandens
FamilyPlantaginaceae
Geographic OriginSouth America
Unique Characteristics• Trumpet-shaped flowers with white or yellow throat

• Light green, heart-shaped leaves with fuzzy texture

• Slender vines
Plant Type• Perennial

• Annual
Plant Size1 to 6 feet
Watering RequirementsAverage
Sunlight Exposure RequirementsPrefers full sun to partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 9 to 10
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)No

Thanks to its crawling nature, the trailing snapdragon goes by many names, like twining snapdragon and vining snapdragon. In the right conditions, it can grow to as long as 9 feet and as wide as 6 feet.

Hence, the trailing snapdragon is a favorite to grow in planter boxes and hanging baskets where its woody vine and trumpet-shaped flowers can shine.

Speaking of, it’s important to mention that the trailing snapdragon prefers supports that have a small diameter, no more than an inch wide. This is primarily because its vines are rather frail and slender. 

Trailing Snapdragon
Image: Wikipedia

On the bright side, the trailing snapdragon plant is favored for producing blooms throughout the entire season. In some cases, it continues to grow flowers even until fall. 

Its flowers are usually a deep purple color while the inside of its trumpet is often a pale white or yellow. Given its shape, it’s an attractive bloom for hummingbirds, so keep an eye out for potential visitors!

The color of its blooms also standout nicely against its backdrop of light green-colored foliage. Its heart-shaped leaves have small hairs that give it a fuzzy texture.

Trailing Snapdragon
Image: Jason Penney on Flickr

Given its geographical origin, the trailing snapdragon prefers environments that receive full sun to partial shade. If you plan to grow it in a hot climate, it can do with dappled shade, especially during hotter hours.

As for watering, it only needs about 1 inch of water weekly. Since it’s quite drought-tolerant, it can withstand mildly dry soil for a while. 

Speaking of soil, the trailing snapdragon isn’t too fussy about the pH level either. In fact, it even has a reputation for being able to grow in so-called infertile land. 

As a result, planting trailing snapdragons should be an easy feat even for gardeners without a green thumb.

Trailing Snapdragon
Image: Caribbean Garden Seeds

In case you’re wondering why the flowers of the trailing snapdragon look so familiar, this is because it’s commonly used as a garnish for desserts and drinks. 

So apart from the fun of growing it, you can also try your hand at cooking and garnishing with the trailing snapdragon’s edible flowers.

7. Chocolate Vine

Chocolate Vine
Image: Jurassic Plants
Common Name(s)• Chocolate Vine

• Five Leaf Akebia

• Five Leaf Chocolate Vine

• Raisin Vine
Scientific NameAkebia quinata
FamilyLardizabalaceae
Geographic Origin• Asia

• North America
Unique Characteristics• Purplish-brown colored flowers with 3 petals and have a slightly chocolate-like scent

• Oval-shaped, glossy green, and grow in a cluster of 5
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size15 to 60 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Prefers full sun

• Tolerates partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 4 to 8
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)No

We’re sorry to disappoint you, but the Chocolate Vine plant doesn’t actually smell or taste like chocolate. It got its moniker because of its, er, chocolate-looking flowers according to others.  

While it may take a while to see the uncanny resemblance, the Chocolate Vine produces purplish-brown colored blooms that have a slightly chocolate-like scent. 

Given its deep color, its flowers are eye-catching against the glossy, bright green leaves. Its foliage is oval-shaped and grows in a cluster of 5 compounded leaves. 

Chocolate Vine
Image: Jurassic Plants

Its flowers are also unique for having just 3 petals that typically bloom early in the springtime. If left alone, it’ll transform into long, sausage-shaped fruits late in the summer.

When cut open, you’ll find its white flesh and small black seeds in its pulp that resemble a kiwi. While it’s safe to eat, we’ve got to warn you that it isn’t the best tasting fruit out there. 

Chocolate Vine
Image: Valentine E-shop

So if you’re not growing Chocolate Vine to harvest its fruits, you can let it grow as long as you want. In fact, it can reach lengths of up to 60 feet because of its speedy and vigorous growth habit. 

Hence, the Chocolate Vine is a great plant to grow as ground cover or along trellises, archways, and walls.

However, you’ll need to keep a close eye on it as it tends to overtake nearby plantlife. As a result, heavy maintenance will be required to keep the Chocolate Vine in a manageable size.

Chocolate Vine
Image: Crocus

The Chocolate Vine plant thrives in full sun, receiving at least 6 hours of exposure daily. While it can tolerate shade pretty well, don’t expect as many flowers and fruits. 

It also has moderate water requirements, only needing weekly watering once it’s established. After, it can tolerate mildly dry conditions, so you can get away with about 1-2 inches of dry topsoil before your next watering session.

8. Clematis

Clematis
Image: Michigan Bulb
Common Name(s)• Clematis

• Purple Clematis Vine
Scientific NameClematis viticella
FamilyRanunculaceae
Geographic Origin• China

• Japan

• Europe

• North America
Unique Characteristics• Deep purple-colored petals

• Cream or yellow stamens

• Woody stem
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size2 to 30 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Prefers full sun

• Tolerates partial shade
Climate ZoneZone 4 to 9
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)No

Did you know that this tropical-looking plant can actually tolerate extreme cold? While they may look dainty and frail, the Clematis plant can actually withstand temperatures as low as -30F or -34C.

Apart from that, Clematis also has a reputation for being an aggressive climber. In fact, it has garnered the nickname, “Queen of Climbers”, because of its ability to grow faster than you can blink. 

Having said that, this also means that you’ll need to prepare your space accordingly because Clematis has bushy foliage and large flowers. 

Clematis
Image: The Old Farmer’s Almanac

The Jackman Clematis variety is one of the most popular because its flowers typically grow to about 6 inches across. This makes them a great choice if you want eye-catching blooms that can easily be admired from a distance. 

Clematis
Image: Jackson & Perkins

Another fan favorite is the Clematis Etoile Violette for its deep royal purple color, which is striking against light-colored backgrounds. Each bloom has around 6 to 7 petals and a cream and yellow-colored stamen. 

These velvety flowers only grow to about 3 inches big, but the plant itself can reach heights of up to 12 feet. 

Clematis
Image: Taylors Clematis

Regardless of the variety, Clematis plants are typically low maintenance. They require moderate watering, about 1 inch weekly, and adequate drainage to prevent root rot. 

You should situate your Clematis in an area that receives full sun, at least 3 to 4 hours, to grow many flowers. While it can withstand half-day sun and partial shade, don’t expect as many blooms.

9. Blue Glory Vine

Blue Glory Vine
Image: Monaco Nature Encyclopedia
Common Name(s)• Blue Glory Vine

• Bengal Clock Vine
Scientific NameThunbergia battiscombei
FamilyAcanthaceae (Acanthus)
Geographic OriginAfrica
Unique Characteristics• Purplish blue-colored flowers with a yellow throat

• Trumpet-shaped flowers

• Petals have a velvety texture with a little fuzz

• Light green, lancet-shaped leaves
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size2 to 20 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Prefers full sun

• Tolerates partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 10 to 12
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)No

The Blue Glory Vine is widely used as an ornamental plant because it grows large blooms that have a striking purplish-blue hue. 

Its flowers grow to around 3 inches in diameter in a trumpet-like shape. Its petals have a velvety texture with a little fuzz, which makes them quite soft to the touch.

Meanwhile, the throat of the flower is a lighter purple shade with a yellow bottom. If you’re looking to invite more wildlife into your garden, it’s worth highlighting that its flowers are popular among pollinators such as birds, butterflies, and birds, to name a few.

Blue Glory Vine
Image: Dave’s Garden

Its leaves, on the other hand, are light green and lance-shaped. It has a smooth edge and grows to about 7 inches long. 

The Blue Glory Vine is an evergreen vining shrub that’s typically only grown to about 2 to 3 feet with regular pruning. Given its cute stature, it’s typically grown in large pots or in-ground along walkways and entrances.

Even then, it can grow up to 20 feet long in a single season without any maintenance. Thus, gardeners have the freedom to let it grow however big or small they want it to be.

Blue Glory Vine
Image: Annie’s Annuals

Thankfully, caring for the Blue Glory Vine isn’t that difficult. In fact, it can grow in a variety of habitats, from grasslands to hillsides that are as much as 300 meters above sea level. 

With that said, the Blue Glory Vine is more resilient and adaptable than its delicate appearance makes it out to be.

But here’s the hitch: it can’t stand extreme cold. Because of its tropical origin, the lowest it can tolerate is 25F or -4C. Nevertheless, it’s still pretty hardy, so you can expect it to survive the winter and bloom once more. 

10. Hyacinth Bean Vine

Hyacinth Bean Vine
Image: North Carolina Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox
Common Name(s)• Hyacinth Bean Vine

• Purple Hyacinth Bean Vine
Scientific NameLablab purpureus
FamilyFabaceae
Geographic OriginAfrica
Unique Characteristics• Shell-like, purple-colored flowers

• Burgundy-colored stem with a woody texture

• Glossy, burgundy-colored seed pods that have a leathery texture

• Bright green, heart-shaped leaves
Plant TypeAnnual
Plant Size10 to 20 feet
Watering RequirementsHigh
Sunlight Exposure RequirementsFull sun
Climate ZoneZones 9 to 11
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)Yes (if not cooked properly)

If you’re in the market for exotic and tropical-looking purple flowers, you may want to consider the Hyacinth Bean Vine. 

As its name suggests, it’s a vining plant that can effortlessly grow up to 20 feet long. Though, don’t forget to provide ample support to allow it to trail along walls, archways, and trellises, among others.

Hyacinth Bean Vine
Image: Dengarden

The Hyacinth Bean Vine is perfect for purple lovers because virtually all of its parts are purple-colored. Its showy flowers have purple flowers that resemble shells that tend to look similar to sweet peas when fully developed.

Though since the Hyacinth Bean Vine is an annual, gardeners will only get to appreciate its stunning blooms and vining nature during the right season. In most cases, flowers begin to make an appearance around mid-summer.

After some time, these will transform into glossy, burgundy-colored, cocoon-looking seed pods. Fun fact: these leathery pods can either be used as an ornamental decoration or eaten.

Hyacinth Bean Vine
Image: North Carolina Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox

Its stems are also purple-colored and have a woody appearance. Meanwhile, its heart-shaped leaves are large and bright green, which helps the blooms easily stand out.  

The Hyacinth Bean Vine is also quite magical because they’re known to be able to sprout from anywhere. They germinate rather quickly so it won’t take long until you have an abundance of blooms.

Hyacinth Bean Vine
Image: Select Seeds

Just like most plants that have showy flowers, they thrive in locations that receive full sun. So if you want a ton of stunning flowers and aggressively growing vines, you’ll need to give your plant the sun it deserves.

Having said that, it has high watering requirements, especially in the summertime. Since the Hyacinth Bean Vine is a rather thirsty plant, you’ll want to ensure that your soil is well-draining. 

To know when you need to water, check whether the top 3 inches of soil appear dry and sandy. If so, then that’s a sign that your Hyacinth Bean Vine needs a deep watering session.

11. Blue Morning Glory

Blue Morning Glory
Image: The Toronto Star
Common Name(s)Morning Glory
Scientific NameIpomoea 
FamilyConvolvulaceae
Geographic Origin• Mexico

• Central America
Unique Characteristics• Flowers remain closed until morning sunlight

• Trumpet-shaped flowers with light-colored throats

• Bright green-colored foliage

• Thin stem with vining behavior
Plant Type• Perennial

• Annual
Plant SizeFull sun
Watering RequirementsLow
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Prefers full sun

• Tolerates partial sun
Climate ZoneZones 9 to 11
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)No

From mid-day until throughout the night, the Morning Glory remains closed up, like an umbrella. It isn’t until dawn when they’ve been greeted by the morning sunlight that they begin to unravel and show their beautiful petals.

Because of this behavior, the Morning Glory was given such a name. With over 1,000 different species, this plant is well-loved for this behavior.

Blue Morning Glory
Image: Housing

The Morning Glory produces trumpet-shaped flowers of various colors, from bright blues to dark purples. These grow to about 2 to 3 inches long and typically have a lighter, almost white-colored throat.

Meanwhile, its leaves are lance-shaped with a pointy tip. They’re bright green, which helps the blooms stand out. 

These grow anywhere from 2 to 5 inches long depending on the variety and also have tiny, soft hairs on the underside.

Blue Morning Glory
Image: Gardening Know How

Among the different varieties, one of the most popular purple-colored Morning Glory plants includes the Black Kniolas or the Common Morning Glory (Ipomoea purpurea). Despite the name, it isn’t black at all. 

In fact, it has a light purplish-pink center that smoothly fades into purple as it reaches the end of its petals. At the center of each petal is a dark purple-colored line that adds a unique touch.

Blue Morning Glory
Image: Farmacie Isolde

If you prefer lighter shades of purple such as lavender, you may like the Wedding Bell variety of the Morning Glory plant. 

Also funnel-shaped, these blooms only grow to about 3 to 4 inches. It has heart-shaped leaves with a pointy end along with a thin, hairless vine. 

What’s great about this variety is that it doesn’t have a strong preference for full sun. It can grow beautiful mid-sized blooms in locations that receive partial shade. 

Blue Morning Glory
Image: Horticulture Magazine

Native to the tropics, the Morning Glory loves temperate regions, which also means that most varieties prefer full sun. 

They’re also drought resistant, which means that they won’t suffer tremendously if you forget to water them. 

This also makes them easy to care for since they only require about 1 inch of water weekly. During the drier season, you can water about twice a week. 

Blue Morning Glory
Image: Brisbane City Council

Another unique behavior about the Morning Glory varieties is that they’re self-seeding, which means that they can grow virtually anywhere. This could pose problems when they begin to grow in unwanted areas and can no longer be maintained.

Because they’re aggressive climbers, they can easily engulf nearby structures in their vines without regular pruning.

Hence, it’s recommended that you grow Morning Glory in hanging baskets and pots to allow its vines to effortlessly trail to the ground. 

12. Bittersweet Nightshade

Bittersweet Nightshade
Image: Authentic Wisconsin
Common Name(s)• Bittersweet Nightshade

• Blue Bindweed

• Climbing Nightshade

• Felonwort or Fellenwort

• Poisonberry

• Scarlet Berry

• Trailing Bittersweet or Trailing Nightshade

• Deadly Nightshade
Scientific NameSolanum dulcamara
FamilySolanaceae
Geographic Origin• North Africa

• Europe

• Asia
Unique Characteristics• Flowers form loose clusters of five recurved, purple-colored petals with pointy tips that are only about 1 to 1.5 centimeters across

• Bright yellow protruding stamens that point upward

• Dark green to purplish leaves are shaped like arrowheads and have a lobed base
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size3 to 13 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate
Sunlight Exposure RequirementsTolerates full sun, partial shade, or full shade
Climate ZoneZones 4 to 8
Toxicity (Touch)Yes
Toxicity (Ingestion)Yes

The most unique feature of the Bittersweet Nightshade is its exotic-looking, star-shaped blooms. Its flowers form loose clusters of five recurved, purple-colored petals with pointy tips that are only about 1 to 1.5 centimeters across. 

In the middle, it has bright yellow protruding stamens that point upward. Meanwhile, its lush dark green to purplish leaves are shaped like arrowheads and have a lobed base. 

Bittersweet Nightshade
Image: Authentic Wisconsin

After some time, its flowers will turn into berry-like fruits that look similar to a cherry tomato. They’re soft and juicy, which make them a sought-after snack among birds. 

As a result, its seeds are easily dispersed, so don’t be surprised if you suddenly find Bittersweet Nightshade growing in unwanted places.

Be warned, though, that as enticing and delicious as these berries may look, they’re actually poisonous. 

Unlike humans and livestock, birds that eat these frequently have already developed a resistance to the toxin.

Bittersweet Nightshade
Image: Seashore to Forest Floor

A herbaceous perennial vine, it can become easily overgrown without proper maintenance. In fact, they can grow to about 13 feet tall if left alone. 

Hence, we suggest providing structural support such as an archway, trellis, or wall to give the vining plant direction. Alternatively, you can grow it in a hanging basket or pot, letting its vines droop downward on its own.

Because of its aggressively vining nature, it tends to become densely matted, which makes it an ideal home for small critters and woodland creatures. In some cases, it could house pests like rats and squirrels, so tread carefully.

Bittersweet Nightshade
Image: First Nature

As far as care goes, the Bittersweet Nightshade is relatively low-maintenance. It’s capable of growing virtually anywhere, from roadsides to alongside ponds.

It thrives in areas that have moist soil and receive partial shade. Nevertheless, it can tolerate full sun or completely low-lit areas.

If you live in an area that experiences extreme cold, it’s worth mentioning that the Bittersweet Nightshade can withstand temperatures as low as -30F or -34C for a short period of time.

13. Purple Nightshade

Purple Nightshade
Image: Southwest Desert Flora
Common Name(s)• Purple Nightshade

• Chaparral Nightshade

• San Diego Nightshade
Scientific NameSolanum xanti
FamilySolanaceae
Geographic Origin• Western USA

• Northwest Mexico
Unique Characteristics• Trumpet-shaped, showy flowers with flared lavender-colored petals with a single yellow pistil at the center

• Leaves are lance to ovate-shaped and grow to 2 inches long

• Woody yet slender stems that have small hair-like follicles
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size2 to 8 feet
Watering RequirementsLow
Sunlight Exposure Requirements• Thrives in full sun to partial shade

• Tolerates full shade
Climate ZoneZones 7 to 10
Toxicity (Touch)Yes
Toxicity (Ingestion)Yes

Another popular purple-colored bloom from the Solanaceae family is the Purple Nightshade. Its flowers are rather large and showy, with flared lavender-colored petals with a single yellow pistil at the center.

These somewhat trumpet-shaped flowers remain in bloom for a while, attracting several kinds of pollinators, from butterflies to birds. Afterwards, these blooms turn into purple-colored berries that birds snack on. 

Purple Nightshade
Image: Califlora

Its foliage, on the other hand, is dark green in color which helps the soft lavender blooms stand out. Its leaves are lance to ovate-shaped and grow to about 2 inches long. 

These grow on woody yet slender stems that have small hair-like follicles on it. It can grow to about 2 to 3 feet tall, depending on the conditions. 

The Purple Nightshade is well-liked for its aggressive vining nature and dense foliage. This behavior helps it to always look incredibly lush and full.

However, some gardeners find this behavior difficult to deal with as the Purple Nightshade has the tendency to block sunlight for nearby plants, causing them to die.

Purple Nightshade
Image: Southwest Desert Flora

Speaking of, the Purple Nightshade has a strong preference for full sun to partially shaded locations. Otherwise, you won’t get as many blooms. 

They’re also quite drought resistant and only require minimal watering once established. In fact, it only needs about an inch of water weekly. 

But here’s the hitch: all parts of the Purple Nightshade, especially its fruits, are toxic and there isn’t a cure for it. 

Ingestion could cause problems with one’s gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems. Meanwhile, touching it could cause dermatitis.

As a result, you may want to keep this plant out of reach from children and pets.

14. Lavender Trumpet Vine

Lavender Trumpet Vine
Image: Roger’s Gardens
Common Name(s)• Lavender Trumpet Vine

• Violet Trumpet Vine
Scientific NameClytostoma callistegioides
FamilyBignoniaceae
Geographic OriginBrazil
Unique Characteristics• Trumpet-shaped, lilac-colored blooms. 

• White and pale yellow-colored throat that spills out into 5 oval-shaped petals.

• Petals have a dark purple streak that runs from the tip to inside of the throat.

• Ovate-shaped, leathery and glossy, light green leaves
Plant TypePerennial
Plant Size3 to 25 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate
Sunlight Exposure RequirementsPrefers full sun to partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 9 to 11
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)No

As it’s called, the Lavender Trumpet Vine is a woody vining plant that has lavender-colored and trumpet-shaped blooms that grow to be about 3 inches wide. 

Though in some cases, its flowers have a more soft lilac-like shade of purple, which make them great for pastel tone lovers.

It has a white and pale yellow colored throat that spills out into 5 oval-shaped petals. They’re also lined with dark purple streaks that somewhat resemble veins, giving it a unique touch.

Lavender Trumpet Vine
Image: GardensOnline

Its leaves, on the other hand, are ovate-shaped with a leathery yet glossy finish. They’re light green in color while its stems are dark green.

Because of how densely it can grow, the Lavender Trumpet Vine is best planted to cover overhead structures such as archways, fences, and pergolas. This way, its long tendrils can free flow downwards.

Alternatively, it can be used as a privacy screen by trailing it across latticework, trellises, and fences, among other structures. 

Lavender Trumpet Vine
Image: The Paintbox Garden

When it comes to caring for it, the Lavender Trumpet Vine prefers full sun and grows best in zones 9 to 11. 

Having mentioned that, it doesn’t handle the cold all too well. As a result, it’ll need additional protection once temperatures drop.

Nevertheless, as long as it receives full sun, you can expect an abundance of both blooms and foliage from your Lavender Trumpet Vine. 

Though, be sure to prune it every once in a while or else it’ll easily overtake nearby structures and plants.

15. Dutchman’s Pipe

Dutchman's Pipe
Image: Flora Toskana
Common Name(s)• Dutchman’s Pipe

• Brazilian Dutchman’s Pipe

• Giant Pelican Flower

• Pelican Flower
Scientific NameAristolochia gigantea
FamilyAristolochiaceae
Geographic Origin• Brazil

• Central America
Unique Characteristics
Plant TypeDeciduous
Plant Size15 to 30 feet
Watering RequirementsModerate
Sunlight Exposure RequirementsPrefers full sun to partial shade
Climate ZoneZones 10 to 12
Toxicity (Touch)No
Toxicity (Ingestion)Yes

The Dutchman’s Pipe is one of the most unique-looking plants out there. Hence, it can appear to be a variety of things depending on who you ask. 

According to some, the flowers of the Dutchman’s Pipe looks similar to a human fetus. Hence, its name Aristolochia which is Greek for best childbirth

Meanwhile, others reckon that the lobes of the flower look similar to a Dutch smoking pipe, hence the name.

Dutchman's Pipe
Image: Jiffy Plants

If you look closely, the flowers of the Dutchman’s Pipe don’t actually have any petals. Instead, it has a dark maroonish-purple lobe that opens 6 inches wide, exposing an orange-yellow throat and pink vine-like marks.

Though since it’s a deciduous vine, its flowers and foliage won’t always be around. Thus, we suggest taking the time to admire this show-stopping plant while it’s on full display.

Dutchman's Pipe
Image: National Parks Board

Because of its climbing habit, the Dutchman’s Pipe is a great ornamental plant to add to trellises, archways, and walls. 

Though because of how densely it can grow, it can easily block sunlight from reaching nearby plants. 

Speaking of, the Dutchman’s Pipe prefers locations that receive full sun. Nevertheless, it fares well in the shade, especially during the summertime. 

Dutchman's Pipe
Image: Pinterest

If you have pets or children nearby, it’s worth remembering that all parts of the Dutchman’s Pipe are considered poisonous.

It contains a type of toxin called aristolochic acid that’s poisonous to the kidneys. When consumed leads to acute poisoning, or worse, death.

FAQs

What are vining plants?


Vining plants have a climbing growth habit. Apart from their main stem, they grow small, wiry, arm-like tendrils that latch onto nearby structures to support its growth.

Where can I grow my vining plants?

You can grow your vining plants virtually anywhere that gives it enough support to climb on. These include trellises, archways, arbors, poles, and walls, among others. 

Alternatively, you can grow your vining plants on hanging baskets or pots to allow it to simply grow and droop downward.

How long do vining plants grow?


Vining plants will continue to grow as long as they have adequate growing conditions. Hence, it’s important to regularly prune them to keep them in check.

Can I grow my vining plant indoors?


You can grow your vining plant indoors as long as you ensure that its growing conditions meet its requirements. 

If your vining plant needs full sun, position it in an area that receives the longest amount of sunlight. 

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